The Oracle

A jump and a jive for Child Health Day

Hamline University Dance Marathon begins registration for their event this February.

Sophomore+Alex+Pick%2C+first-years+Danielle+Franke%2C+Emily+Kettering+and+Nidhi+Jariwala%2C+were+among+the+first+to+jump.
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A jump and a jive for Child Health Day

Sophomore Alex Pick, first-years Danielle Franke, Emily Kettering and Nidhi Jariwala, were among the first to jump.

Sophomore Alex Pick, first-years Danielle Franke, Emily Kettering and Nidhi Jariwala, were among the first to jump.

Heather Mostoller

Sophomore Alex Pick, first-years Danielle Franke, Emily Kettering and Nidhi Jariwala, were among the first to jump.

Heather Mostoller

Heather Mostoller

Sophomore Alex Pick, first-years Danielle Franke, Emily Kettering and Nidhi Jariwala, were among the first to jump.

Molly Landaeta, Reporter

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A bounce house is not something you would typically see on a college campus, especially not indoors. But if you took a stroll through Anderson Forum on Oct. 1, the sight was impossible to miss.

In honor of National Child Health Day, Hamline University Dance Marathon (HUDM) set up this fun attraction to bring out the child in all of us; the goal being to get students excited and involved with their organization.

Jump for Gillette was HUDM’s kickoff event for registration. Students were invited to bounce as much as they wanted, and encouraged to register for the event coming up this February.

“[HUDM] is a new organization… that raises funds and awareness for Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare,” sophomore and president of HUDM Alex Pick said.

This national movement involves 4 to 48 continuous hours of dancing put on with the purpose of raising money for Children’s Miracle Network hospitals that work to help kids in need of medical intervention.

“At many other universities, the majority of students participate in Dance Marathon,” sophomore and vice president of HUDM Amanda Danielson said. “One of my biggest goals for my time at Hamline is to make Dance Marathon a part of Hamline’s culture, and to encourage everyone to…get involved.”

Last spring at the preview event, there were 52 participants that raised over $500, and that was in the midst of a blizzard. This year’s goal is to have 150 participants and to fundraise $5000.

Throughout the year, there will be events to gain publicity as well as opportunities to fundraise, the first being on Oct. 23 at the Chipotle on Grand Ave. From 5 to 9 p.m., mention HUDM at checkout to support kids through Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare..

“We need to interact with the kids more,” sophomore and Oracle reporter Audra Grigus said. “We do a lot in the Midway area, but we need to do more elsewhere.”

Grigus spent hours volunteering at the kickoff event collecting new student throwdown points, but her connection with the organization goes much deeper. As a good friend of Pick’s and previous participant, Grigus has watched Dance Marathon grow so much in just the last year.

“I’m really excited to watch the Hamline community give back in a way that’s fun and can get everyone involved,” Grigus said. “Seeing people come together in that way would be really beautiful.”

If you are interested in giving back, join Dance Marathon by registering to participate or donating today. To register, visit their website tinyurl.com/HUDM2019, and provide a $10 donation that goes directly to the hospital.

“You get a free t-shirt, free food and a great experience,” Pick said.

This great experience takes place on Feb. 22 from 7 p.m.-12 a.m. Get a group together, get some sponsors and get ready for night filled with dancing, activities and giving back. As a community dedicated to doing good in all the ways we can, Dance Marathon offers an amazing opportunity to do good for children who really need it.

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A jump and a jive for Child Health Day